John 1:1, John 1:18 in John 20:28 call Jesus God, but only the Father is God.

Purpose

Gospel of JohnThe purpose of this article, and the ones following after it, is to determine whether Jesus is God according to John’s gospel, or whether only the Father is God.  The ultimate purpose is particularly to determine what John meant when he wrote that “the Word was theos (god)” in John 1:1c.  As discussed in the article theos, the word Greek theos has various different meanings.  John 1:1c may, for instance, be translated as:

“The Word was God” (definite) or
“The Word was a god” (indefinite) or
“The Word was like God” (qualitative).

Which of these is the intended meaning should also be the picture of Jesus we find by reading the entire gospel.  To prepare these articles, the gospel was read carefully and all relevant statements were selected and categorized.

Summary

Is Jesus called God in John’s gospel?

The title theos (usually translated “God” or “god”) appears more than 100 times in John’s gospel:

In most instances it is not clear whether it refers to the Father or to the Son, for instance: “There came a man sent from God, whose name was John” (1:6).

In ten instances it is clear that theos refers to the Father exclusively, for instance, “the Word (Jesus) was with God” (1:1b).  God has never been seen (1:18), while Jesus was seen.  The Father is even called “the one and only God” (5:44; 17:3) and Jesus referred to Him as “My God and your God” (20:17).

Three verses are sometimes used to argue that Jesus is called “God:”

John 1:1c

John 1:1c does not use theos in a definite sense, and therefore may not be translated “the Word was God.”  It is used in a qualitative sense, and therefore may be translated, “the Word was like God.”  Or, using the phraseology from Philippians 2, the Word “existed in the form of God” and had “equality with God” (Phil. 2:6).  But, as also argued in the article Jesus in Philippians 2, if Jesus “existed in the form of God” and if He had “equality with God,” then He is still distinct from God.

John 1:18

John 1:18 calls Jesus “the only begotten theos,” but only in some of the ancient manuscripts.  In the manuscript tradition with the widest geographical distribution, He is called “the only begotten huios” (son).  Therefore, the KJV translates this phrase as “the only begotten Son.”  John originally wrote either theos (god) or huios (son), but somebody corrupted the text either on purpose or by accident, and textual critics are not sure what John actually originally wrote.

John 20:28

John 20:28 records Thomas, when he saw the resurrected Jesus for the first time, as saying “my Lord and my God.”  This happened just after Jesus completed his work on earth and just before the apostle took the work forward in the power of the Holy Spirit.  Thomas could not have referred to Jesus as “God,” for the following reasons:

1. Jesus never taught the disciples that He is God.  Jesus consistently made a distinction between Himself and God.

2. When Thomas said these words, the apostles did not believe that Jesus is God.  For example, the two disciples walking to Emmaus spoke of Him as “a prophet” and said “we had hoped that he was the one who was going to redeem Israel” (Luke 24:19-21).

3. Afterwards, as recorded in the book of Acts, the disciples did not teach that Jesus is God.

Therefore, if Thomas did apply the title theos to Jesus, it could have been in the sense of God’s representative.  The Bible does use theos sometimes in that sense.  But Thomas actually said ho theos.  This title is used for the Father only, and implies that when Thomas said “my God,” he actually referred to the Father.

Conclusion

The evidence is clear that Jesus is not called God in John’s gospel.  Only the Father is God.  However, the view that Jesus is God does not rely on the argument that He is called God.  It is based on other facts, such as that He is worshiped equal to God.  These matters are discussed in the articles that will follow after this one.

John’s Gospel

Critical scholars believe that John’s gospel was written by a number of writers over a period of time.  But the gospel expresses a coherent and consistent view of God and Jesus.  It does not seem to be written by more than one person.

John’s gospel was written much later than the other (synoptic) gospels.  It was written in the eighties or nineties, and has a much higher Christology (view of Christ) than the other gospels.  Some interpreters understand John’s gospel as saying that Jesus existed before His conception in Mary’s womb, and even that Jesus is God Himself.  The other gospels do not have such a high view of Jesus.  In the other gospels Jesus seems to be just a man; an anointed and sanctified man, but still only a man.  Competing views are therefore expressed, namely:

1.  John contradicts the first three gospels. OR

2.  John does not contradict the other gospels, for Jesus is God the Son also in Matthew, Mark and Luke; as divine as the Father is. OR

3. John does not contradict the other gospels, for John’s gospel is generally misunderstood, and even in John’s gospel Jesus is merely a man; God’s Messiah; and not God.

Unless otherwise stated, all quotes are from the NASB of John’s gospel.

Jesus is distinct from God.

Rather than referring to Jesus as God, John’s gospel reserves the title “God” for the Father.  The following phrases make a distinction between Jesus and God:

The Word (Jesus) was with God” (1:1b).

No one has seen God at any time” (1:18).  (Jesus was seen.)

God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish, but have eternal life. For God did not send the Son into the world to judge the world, but that the world might be saved through Him.” (3:16-17)

You do not seek the glory that is from the one and only God” (5:44).

This is the work of God, that you believe in Him whom He has sent” (6:29).

You are seeking to kill Me, a man who has told you the truth, which I heard from God” (8:40).

I proceeded forth and have come from God“ (8:42).

Do not let your heart be troubled; believe in God, believe also in Me” (14:1-2).

This is eternal life, that they may know You, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom You have sent” (17:3).

John 17:3

Most of these quote Jesus’ words, making a distinction between Himself and God.  Two of these quotes refer to “the only true God” (17:3; cf. 5:44).  God is invisible (1:18), sent His Son (3:16-17; 6:29; 8:42; 17:3) and taught Jesus the truth (8:40).  His disciples, listening to these words, would not get the idea that Jesus is God.  To the contrary, in 8:40 Jesus refers to himself as “a man.”  Therefore, why would Thomas refer to Jesus as “my God” in John 20:28?  Where did he get the idea that Jesus is God?

The Father is God.

Jesus refers most often to “God” as the “Father.” It is important to understand that in John’s gospel, and in the entire New Testament, the title “God” is a synonym for “the Father,” for instance:

Do not let your heart be troubled; believe in God, believe also in Me. In My Father’s house are many dwelling places” (14:1-2).

Jesus said to Mary, “I ascend to My Father and your Father, and My God and your God” (20:17).

If only the Father is God, then it obviously follows that the Son is not called God.  But there are some Trinitarians that view the Father and Son to be a single self, and in Modalism the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit are simply three modes of the same single divine Being.  Contrary to these views, the following shows that Jesus is distinct from the Father:

Thinking about His approaching death, Jesus said, “Now My soul has become troubled; and what shall I say, ‘Father, save Me from this hour’? But for this purpose I came to this hour” (12:27).
(In Gethsemane He similarly prayed, “My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from Me; yet not as I will, but as You will” (Mt. 26:39).  This shows that the Father and Jesus two separate wills.)

If you loved Me, you would have rejoiced because I go to the Father, for the Father is greater than I” (14:28; cf. 10:29).

The Father and the Son are therefore distinct Beings.  And, in the way that the New Testament uses the title “God,” only the Father is God

The Father is God for Jesus.

The following verse even identifies the Father as Jesus’ God:

Jesus said to Mary, “I ascend to My Father and your Father, and My God and your God” (20:17).

John, who also wrote the Revelation, quotes Jesus saying, “He who overcomes, I will make him a pillar in the temple of My God” (Rev. 3:12; cf. 3:13).

Conclusion

The title theos (usually translated God or god) appears more than 100 times in John:

In most instances it is not clear whether it refers to the Father or to the Son, for instance: “There came a man sent from God, whose name was John” (1:6).

Above ten instances are mentioned where theos refers to the Father only.

On the other hand, there are three instances (1:1, 18 and 20:28) where theos perhaps refers to Jesus.  Separate articles have been placed on this website for each of these verses.  Below these articles are summarized:

John 1:1c

John 1:1This is usually translated “the Word was God.”  A series of articles on this website addresses the translation of John 1:1c.  One article evaluates the translation “The Word was God” and another the translation “The Word was a god.”  In these articles it is shown that neither of these translations are appropriate because the word theos is used in a qualitative sense in that phrase, as grammarians agree.  It should rather be translated as “the Word was like God.”

Both John 1:1 and Philippians 2 describe Jesus before He became a human being.  The article Jesus in Philippians 2 proposed that “the Word was theos” can be understood as equivalent to the statements in Philippians 2 that Jesus “existed in the form of God” and had “equality with God” and “at the name of Jesus every knee will bow” (Phil. 2:6, 10).  But, as also argued in that article, if Jesus “existed in the form of God” and if He had “equality with God,” then He is still distinct from God.

John 1:18

This verse is discussed in the article: John 1:18. In the NASB, this verse reads,

No one has seen God at any time; the only begotten God who is in the bosom of the Father, He has explained Him.”

The word “God” appears twice in this verse.  The first “God” refers to the Father, who is described as invisible.  Since God is invisible, the conclusion can be that Jesus is distinct from God.

The second “God” in 1:18 refers to Jesus, but appears only in some translations.  Twelve of the 27 translation of this verse, as listed by BibleHub, describe Jesus as God in this verse.  The other (mostly older) translations, use a different source text, which actually has the widest geographical distribution, and which describes Jesus as “the only begotten Son.”  John originally wrote either theos (god) or huios (son), but somebody corrupted the text either on purpose or by accident.  It is the task of the textual critic to determine which was the original wording.  As discussed in the article Is Jesus God in John 1:18? neither the external or internal evidence is conclusive.  Because of this uncertainty, this verse should not be used as evidence that Jesus is called God.

John 20:28

This verse is discussed in the article on John 20:28.  Thomas would not believe the reports that Jesus was raised from death, but when He saw Jesus in person, a few days later, he exclaimed, “My Lord and my God” (20:28)!  Jesus did not reprove Thomas.

For some this provides the best evidence that Jesus is God.  It is said that Jesus is here without doubt called “God.”  However, strong circumstantial evidence exists that Thomas could not have referred to Jesus as God:

1. Jesus did not teach the disciples that He is God.  Jesus never used the term θεός (theos = god) for Himself, but described Himself as the Christ and as the Son of God.  As discussed above, Jesus consistently made a distinction between Himself and God.  John summarized the main thesis of his book as follows:

These have been written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God” (John 20:31).

2. The events in the immediate context of John 20:28 show that the disciples did not believe that Jesus is God.  The two disciples walking to Emmaus demonstrate the thoughts of Jesus’ followers at that time.  Speaking to the resurrected Christ, whom they mistook as just a traveler, they described Jesus as “a prophet, powerful in word and deed before God…and they crucified him; but we had hoped that he was the one who was going to redeem Israel” (Luke 24:19-21).

3. The events in the book of Acts began a few weeks after Jesus appeared to Thomas.  If the apostles really believed that Jesus is God, that would have been their message in Acts, but such a statement is never even once found in Acts.

4. Paul was given the task of interpreting the dramatic Christ-events and to teach the church through his letters.  He did not teach that Jesus is God, but wrote the head of Christ is God” (1 Cor. 11:3).   According to some translations of Romans 9:5, Paul referred to Jesus as God, but the article on Romans 9:5 shows that it is all a matter of punctuation, and all punctuation in the Bible is interpretation.

The article on John 20:28 analyses possible interpretations of Thomas’ exclamation.  Since the word theos has many different meanings, Thomas might have described Jesus as God-like or as mandated by God to speak for Him.  These are valid alternative meanings of the word theos.  See the article THEOS.  Another option is that Thomas did not address Jesus, but that He addressed the Father as “my God.”  Since Thomas did not merely say theos, but ho theos, this is quite possible.

But which of these is what Thomas actually meant is not important.  What is important is that the immediate and wider context prevents us from understanding John 20:28 as saying that Jesus is God.

Conclusion

The evidence is clear that Jesus is not called God in John’s gospel.  Only the Father is God.  However, the view that Jesus is God does not rely on the argument that He is called God.  It is based on other facts, such as:

He is worshiped equal to God.
The Jews thought that Jesus “was … making Himself equal with God” (5:18).
Jesus said, “Before Abraham was, I am” (8:58), “I and the Father are one” (10:30) and “He who has seen Me has seen the Father” (14:9).

These matters are discussed in the articles that will follow after this one.

NEXT:  Did Jesus claim to be God?

Is Jesus called “God” in Paul’s letter to the Romans?

Summary

One of the seven NT verses, that possibly refers to Jesus as God, is Romans 9:5. All references to “God” in the letter to the Romans were analysed and it was found that Romans consistently makes a distinction between God and Jesus.  The only possible exception is Romans 9:5. The 28 translations of this verse, as provided by BibleHub, were compared.  14 of those translations state that Jesus is God.  The other 14 make a distinction between God and Jesus.  It is all a matter of punctuation, and all punctuation in the Bible is interpretation; a reflection of the understanding of the meaning of the passage when the punctuation was added; hundreds of years after Paul wrote.

Furthermore, Romans 9:5 contains the phrase “who is over all” and gives thanks. To read Romans 9:5 as describing Jesus as God, He must be the One who is over all” and receives thanks.  But in all other places in Paul’s writings “who is over all” refers not to Christ, but to God.  Similarly, everywhere else in Paul’s writings our thanks go to God; not to Jesus.

Given these facts, and since Paul nowhere else applied the title “God” to our Lord, Romans 9:5 should not be used to argue that Jesus is God.

Introduction

One of the seven New Testament verses that possibly refers to Jesus as God, according the authoritative book by Murray Harris, is Romans 9:5.  The purpose of this article is to evaluate this finding.

For this purpose, all references to “God” in the letter to the Romans were identified.  Then those references that provide further identification, as to whether “God” refer to Jesus or not, were identified.  Fourteen instances were found.

13 instances make a distinction between God and Jesus.

13 of those 14 instances make a distinction between God and Jesus.  This implies, given the way that Paul used the title “God” in Romans, that Jesus is not God.  These 13 instances are listed below.  The following verses distinguish between the Lord Jesus Christ and God our Father:

God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ” (Rom. 1:7);
The God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Rom. 15:6);

Verses that distinguish between Christ and God with respect to their roles in salvation:

We have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ“ (Rom. 5:1).
We shall be saved from the wrath of God through Him (Christ)“ (Rom. 5:9).
We were reconciled to God through the death of His Son“ (Rom. 5:10).

All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, being justified as a gift by His grace through the redemption which is in Christ Jesus whom God displayed publicly as a propitiation in His blood through faith” (Rom. 3:23-25).

For what the Law could not do, weak as it was through the flesh, God did: sending His own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh” (Rom. 8:3).

Verses that distinguish between Christ and God with respect to who we praise:

I thank my God through Jesus Christ“ (Rom 1:8).
Thanks be to God through Jesus Christ our Lord!“ (Rom. 7:25).
To the only wise God, through Jesus Christ, be the glory forever“ (Rom. 16:27).

The following verse distinguishes between Christ and God with respect to judgment:

God will judge the secrets of men through Christ Jesus“ (Rom 2:16).

Verses that distinguish between Christ and God with respect to what Jesus today does:

The life that He (Christ now) lives, He lives to God“ (Rom. 6:10).
Christ Jesus … who is at the right hand of God“ (Rom. 8:34);

Conclusions

These 13 verses make a clear distinction between God and Jesus, which means that Paul, in Romans, did not use the title “God” for Jesus.  These verses also contain a number of other important principles.

1. The word “through” is found in 8 of the verses.  This is a surprisingly high number and explains the relationship between God and Jesus, namely that everything that God did or does, He did or does through His Son, including creation of all things.  We even worship God through Jesus.

2. One often hears it said that we are saved by Jesus, but these verses show that it is God that saves – through Jesus.

3.  Our thanks goes to God; not to Jesus. This principle is relevant to Romans 9:5, as discussed below.

4. In Romans Paul only twice uses the title “Father;” right in the beginning and at the end of the letter (1:7; 15:6).  His habit therefore was to use “God” to refer to the Father.

Romans 9:5

Only one verse was found which might refer to Jesus as God, and that is Romans 9:5.  At the end of this article the 28 translations of Roman 9:5, as provided by BibleHub, are summarized.  The NIV, for example, reads “the Messiah, who is God over all, forever praised!”  The three components of this phrase, apart from Christ Himself (Messiah in some translations), are:

God
Who is over all, and
Forever praised

The 28 different translations combine the elements differently, resulting in different responses to the question whether this verse states that Jesus is God.

A. In the New Living Translation and three other translations all three components describe Christ, and consequently declare that Jesus is God: “Christ … he is God, … who rules over everything and is worthy of eternal praise!

B. The NIV and nine other translations qualifies “God” with “who is over all:” “the Messiah, who is God over all, forever praised!”  It is possible to read this as saying somewhat less than that Jesus is God, but that He is Ruler over all.

C. The NASB and eleven other translations combine “God” with “forever praised,” and say: “Christ … who is over all, God blessed forever.” This implies that Jesus is not God, but that He is blessed by God; confirming a distinction between God and Jesus.

D. The Contemporary English Version and the Good News Translation link the “who is over all” to “God”, and consequently completely separate Christ and God: “They …  were also the ancestors of the Christ. I pray that God, who rules over all …

In Summary

Four translations say that Jesus is God.
Ten describe Him as “God over all.”
Twelve call Jesus “God blessed,” implying that He is not God, and
Two make a clear distinction between God and Jesus.

In total, 14 translations may be read as supporting the view that Jesus is God and 14 oppose it.  It is all a matter of punctuation, and punctuation is interpretation, for the original text did not contain punctuation.  Metzger (Textual Commentary, 167.) wrote “the presence of punctuation in Greek manuscripts … cannot be regarded as more than the reflection of current exegetical understanding of the meaning of the passage.”

BibleHub quotes from Ellicott’s Commentary for English Readers, which says that  “both ways are possible.”  The commentary continues to say that the word order and the context are somewhat in favour of describing Jesus as God, but other factors are somewhat decidedly against this application:

Firstly, the phrase “who is over all,” and ascription of blessing in all other places in Paul’s writings refer to God;  not to Christ, (Rom. 1:25; 2Cor. 1:3; 2Cor. 11:31; Eph. 1:3; 4:6.).  The analysis above also discovered the following statements that direct our thanks and glory to God; not to Jesus:

I thank my God through Jesus Christ“ (Rom 1:8).
Thanks be to God through Jesus Christ our Lord!“ (Rom. 7:25).
To the only wise God, through Jesus Christ, be the glory forever“ (Rom. 16:27).

Secondly, the commentary states that Paul nowhere else applied the title “God” to our Lord.  This must be an important consideration.

Brian James Wright, in his document, Jesus as Θεός: A Textual Examination, in his analysis dismissed Romans 9:5 up front because Romans 9.5 involves a punctuation issue “which our earliest manuscripts do not answer.” (Douglas J. Moo, “The Christology of the Early Pauline Letters,” in Contours of Christology in the New Testament (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2005), 190.)

Translations of Romans 9:5

The translations below have been color coded into the four categories:
Jesus is God.
Jesus is God over all.
Jesus is God blessed
Jesus and God completely separated

New International Version  “the Messiah, who is God over all, forever praised!”

New Living Translation “Christ … he is God, … who rules over everything and is worthy of eternal praise!”

English Standard Version “Christ, who is God over all, blessed forever.”

Berean Study Bible “Christ, who is God over all, forever worthy of praise!”

Berean Literal Bible “Christ …  being God over all, blessed to the ages.”

New American Standard Bible  “Christ … who is over all, God blessed forever.”

King James Bible “Christ … who is over all, God blessed for ever.”

Christian Standard Bible “Christ, who is God over all, praised forever.”

Contemporary English Version “They …  were also the ancestors of the Christ. I pray that God, who rules over all, will be praised forever! Amen.

Good News Translation “Christ, as a human being, belongs to their race. May God, who rules over all, be praised forever!

Holman Christian Standard Bible “the Messiah, who is God over all, praised forever.”

International Standard Version “the Messiah …  who is God over all, the one who is forever blessed.”

NET Bible “Christ, who is God over all, blessed forever!”

New Heart English Bible “Christ … who is over all, God, blessed forever.”

Aramaic Bible in Plain English “The Messiah … who is The God Who is over all, to Whom are praises and blessings to the eternity of eternities”.

GOD’S WORD® Translation “The Messiah is God over everything, forever blessed.”

New American Standard 1977  “Christ according to the flesh, who is over all, God blessed forever.”

Jubilee Bible 2000 “Christ, who is God over all things, blessed for all the ages.”

King James 2000 Bible “Christ … who is over all, God blessed forever.”

American King James Version “Christ … who is over all, God blessed for ever.”

American Standard Version “Christ … who is over all, God blessed for ever.”

Douay-Rheims Bible “Christ … who is over all things, God blessed for ever.”

Darby Bible Translation “Christ, who is over all, God blessed for ever.”

English Revised Version “Christ as concerning the flesh, who is over all, God blessed for ever.

Webster’s Bible Translation “Christ … who is over all, God blessed for ever.”

Weymouth New Testament “Christ, who is exalted above all, God blessed throughout the Ages.”

World English Bible “Christ … who is over all, God, blessed forever.”

Young’s Literal Translation “Christ … who is over all, God blessed to the ages.”

 

In the Bible Jesus is sometimes called God. Does that mean that Jesus is God?

This is an article in the series, “Is Jesus God?”  The previous articles are:

Jesus has always existed,
God created all things through Jesus,
Jesus has equality with God,
Jesus is God’s only true family and
We must worship Jesus to the glory of God.

On the other hand, in the New Testament, the title “God” is used for the Father exclusively.  That implies that Jesus is not God, in the way that the New Testament uses that title.  This is true of the 1300 instances where we find the word theos (god) in the New Testament.  There are, however, seven instances where Jesus is called theos.  The purpose of this article is to determine what the New Testament writers meant when they wrote that Jesus is God.

God’s name is YHVH.

To appreciate the meaning of the term “God,” first consider the Old Testament.  In the Hebrew Old Testament, the God of Israel has a unique name that is not used for any other being.  That name is YHVH, pronounced as Jehovah or Yahweh.  This name is used all over the Old Testament; more than 6800 times.  Some Bible translations translate YHVH as Yahweh or Jehovah, for instance:

That men may know that thou, whose name alone is JEHOVAH, art the most high over all the earth” (Psalms 83:18, KJV).

But YHVH is most often translated as “the LORD” (capital letters).  The same verse in the NASB reads as follows:

“That they may know that You alone, whose name is the LORD, Are the Most High over all the earth.”

YHVH is here called “Most High.”  This is one of the well-known names for YHVH.  The angel said to Mary, that Jesus “will be called the Son of the Most High” (Luke 1:32).

God said to Moses:

I am the LORD; and I appeared to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, as God Almighty, but by My name, LORD, I did not make Myself known to them” (Ex. 6:2).

This translation actually distorts the meaning, because “Lord” is generally a title; not a name.  It is easier to understand this verse when “the LORD” is replaced with the name “YHVH:”

I am YHVH; and I appeared to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, as God Almighty, but by My name, YHVH, I did not make Myself known to them.”

Now it is easier to understand the verse.  It says that God made His name (YHVH) for the first time known to Moses.  This name does appear in Genesis, but that is because Moses also wrote Genesis.

El and Elohim are general titles.

The word for “god” in Hebrew (generally El or Elohim), in contrast to YHVH, is used both for the true God and for false gods.  El and Elohim are even used for angels and exalted people.  The NASB therefore translates Elohim 45 times as “god” and 204 times as “gods,” and occasionally also as divine, divine being, exceedingly, God’s, goddess, godly, great, judges, mighty, rulers and shrine.  For example:

The True God – “A jealous and avenging God is the LORD” (Nahum 1:2).

False gods – “For My people have forgotten Me, They burn incense to worthless gods” (Jer. 18:15; cf. Ex. 20:3; 32:31).  (The word translated “gods” here is Elohim; exactly the same word elsewhere translated “God.”)

The princes of Egypt “For I will pass through the land of Egypt … and on all the gods [elohim] of Egypt [the princes] I will execute judgments: I am the Lord” (Ex. 12:12).

Judges – The judges appointed by Moses were called gods: “Then his master shall bring him unto the judges [elohim]” (Ex. 21:6, KJV; also see Ex. 22:8-9, 28).

Abraham – The Hittites called Abraham a “mighty [elohim] prince” (Gen. 23:6).

Techniques to make the title “God” specific

Since the title Elohim is non-specific, the Old Testament uses various techniques to be specific when the true God is intended.

Combine with YHVH

Often Elohim is combined with YHVH:

The LORD God” (YHVH Elohim) is found more than 200 times in the NASB, for instance, “the day that the LORD God made earth and heaven” (Gen. 2:4).

The LORD, the God” – about 50 times;

The LORD your God” – about 200 times; For instance, “Then the LORD spoke again to Ahaz, saying ’Ask a sign for yourself from the LORD your God’” (Is. 7:10)

The LORD his God,” for instance, “When a leader sins and unintentionally does any one of all the things which the LORD his God …” (Lev. 4:22)

The LORD my God,” for instance, “I (Daniel) prayed to the LORD my God” (Dan. 9:4)

The LORD our God,” for instance “We have sinned against the LORD our God” (Jer. 3:25) (54 times)

The LORD their God,” for instance, “I am the LORD their God” (Ex 29:46). (12 times)

YHVH in the immediately context

When Elohim is not directly combined with YHVH, YHVH is often used in the immediately context, so that it is still clear that Elohim refers to YHVH, for instance:

So the LORD changed His mind about the harm which He said He would do to His people. Then Moses turned and went down from the mountain with the two tablets of the testimony in his hand, tablets which were written on both sides; they were written on one side and the other. The tablets were God’s work, and the writing was God’s writing engraved on the tablets.” (Ex. 32:14-16)

Jonah 4:6 “The LORD God appointed a plant and it grew up over Jonah … 7 But God appointed a worm when dawn came the next day and it attacked the plant and it withered. 8 When the sun came up God appointed a scorching east wind, and the sun beat down on Jonah’s head so that he became faint and begged with all his soul to die, saying, “Death is better to me than life.” 9 Then God said to Jonah …” (Jonah 4:6-9)

Other techniques

The Old Testament also uses other techniques to ensure that the reader understands that the true God is intended, include:

The phrase “God of Israel” is found more than 60 times, for instance, “Thus says the LORD of hosts, the God of Israel” (Jer. 19:15).  The phrase “God of Israel” makes a distinction between YHVH and the false gods of the surrounding nations, for instance, “Is it because there is no God in Israel that you are going to inquire of Baal-zebub, the god of Ekron?” (2 King 1:3-4).

The phrase “God Almighty” is found 5 times, for example, Jacob said to Joseph, “God Almighty appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan” (Gen 48:3).

Many times God is identified as the “God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob” (e.g. Gen 32:9).

Elohim is not a name.

It is difficult to find a place in the Old Testament where the term Elohim is used for YHVH without further identification.  The name YHVH seems to be always somewhere in the context.  In other words, Elohim is not used in the Old Testament as a unique identifier or as a name for the God of the Bible.

In modern English “God” is used as a unique name for the Most High, but this was not how Elohim was used in the Old Testament.

Conclusion: To ask, in Old Testament times, whether Jesus is Elohim, would not make sense, for Elohim, by itself, at that time, did not identify any specific being uniquely.   One would have had to be more specific, such as to ask whether Jesus is YHVH, or whether Jesus is the Elohim of Israel.

Jesus is called God.

Of the 1314 times that the title “God” appears in the New Testament, seven refers explicitly to Jesus.  Jesus is called “God” three times in John (1:1, 18; 20:27), twice in Paul’s letters (Romans 9:5; Titus 2:13), once by Peter and once in Hebrews (1:8).  This, by itself, does not prove that Jesus is the same as or equal to the Only True and invisible God (John 17:3; Col. 1:15), because “god” is also used for false gods and for exalted created beings, and because Jesus is referred to as “God” in only seven instances.  Furthermore:

 The NT reserves “God” as a name for the Father exclusively.

In a separate article it was shown, from the occurrences of “God” in the New Testament that do provide further identification, that the New Testament consistently and clearly draws a distinction between God and Jesus.  For example:

Paul refers to “God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ” (Rom. 1:7). 

Revelation states. “I saw no temple in it, for the Lord God the Almighty and the Lamb are its temple” (Rev. 21:22). 

John wrote of “the only true God, and Jesus Christ” (John 17:3). 

That article therefore concludes that the New Testament reserves the title “God” for the Father exclusively.  With that use of the term “God,” Jesus is not God.

Another article confirms that Jesus is not God by showing that Jesus is subordinate to God.  For instance, God is the Head of Christ (1 Cor. 11:3) and Christ sits at God’s right hand.  Everything that His Son has, He has received from His Father.  This includes:

His ability to raise the dead: ”Just as the Father has life in Himself, even so He gave to the Son also to have life in Himself” (John 5:26)

His authority to judge: “The Father … gave Him authority to execute judgment, because He is the Son of Man” (John 5:27).

His teachings: “My teaching is not Mine, but His who sent Me” (John 7:16).

The Fullness of Deity: “It was the Father’s good pleasure for all the fullness to dwell in him” (Colossians 1:19; cf. 2:9).

His glory: “My glory which You have given Me” (John 17:24)

We must use the title “God” in the same way that the Bible does.  If we define the title “God” as referring to the Father exclusively, then Jesus is not God.

Is Jesus called God in Romans 9:5?

This is discussed in a separate article, Is Jesus called “God” in Paul’s letter to the Romans?.  In summary: One of the seven NT verses that possibly refers to Jesus as God is Romans 9:5. All references to “God” in the letter to the Romans were analysed and it was found that Romans everywhere makes a distinction between God and Jesus.  The only possible exception is Romans 9:5. The 28 translations of this verse, as provided by BibleHub, were compared.  14 translations may be read as supporting the view that Jesus is God and 12 oppose it.  It is all a matter of punctuation, and all punctuation in the Bible is interpretation; a reflection of the understanding of the meaning of the passage when the punctuation was added; hundreds of years later.

Furthermore, Romans 9:5 contains the phrase “who is over all” and ascribe blessing. To read Romans 9:5 as describing Jesus as God, He must be the One who is “who is over all” and ascribe blessing.  But in all other places in Paul’s writings “who is over all” refer not to Christ, but to God.  Similarly, everywhere else in Paul’s writings our thanks go to God; not to Jesus.

Given these facts, and since Paul nowhere else applied the title “God” to our Lord, Romans 9:5 should not be used to argue that Jesus is God.

Titus 2:13

Our great God and Savior, Christ Jesus, who gave Himself for us to redeem us from every lawless deed, and to purify for Himself a people for His own possession” (Titus 2:13).

But Paul also maintained a clear and consistent distinction between God and Jesus, for instance:

There is but one God, the Father … and one Lord, Jesus Christ” (I Cor. 8:6)
I charge you in the presence of God, who gives life to all things, and of Christ Jesus” (1 Timothy 6:13).

Peter

Peter described Jesus as “our God and Savior, Jesus Christ” (2 Peter 1:1).  But in the very next verse Peter makes a distinction between God and Jesus:

Grace and peace be multiplied to you in the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord” (2 Peter 1:2).

We see the same distinction between God and Jesus in Peter’s statement a few verses later, “Lord Jesus Christ … received honor and glory from God the Father” (2 Peter 1:16-17).

Hebrews

God says of “the Son”: “Your throneO God, is forever and ever” (Heb. 1:8).  But the very next verse reads, “God, your God, has anointed you”.  In other words, God is the God also of “the Son”.

This entire passage is a quote from Psalm 82, where the king is called “God” (v6), saying “God, Your God, has anointed You” (v7). This shows again that people are sometimes called “god”.  Hebrews, under inspiration, applies this to Jesus.  But the point remains; although Jesus is called God, God is also His God.  This statement does not make Him the same as or equal to God.

Thomas

When Jesus showed him His wounds, the doubting Thomas realized that the One standing in front of him is the risen Lord, and he exclaimed:

My Lord and my God” (John 20:28).

However, just a minute before Thomas did not even believe that Jesus was resurrected.  He had no idea of the profound concepts that God would later reveal to John, which we read of in His gospel.  It is unthinkable that Thomas, at that moment, thought of Jesus as the same as or equal to the Only True and invisible God (John 17:3; Col. 1:15).

The Word was God (John 1)

John 1:1 is the best known “proof” that Jesus is God.  John 1:18 is similar to John 1:1.  These two verses are therefore discussed together:

Jesus is distinct from God.

Both verses start by making a distinction between God and Jesus:

John 1:1 refers to Jesus as the Word (see verse 14).  It starts by saying, “in the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God.”  Since Jesus was “with God,” He is distinct from God.

John 1:18 starts by saying that “No one has seen God at any time.”  Colossians 1:15 also describes God as invisible.  Since God is invisible, while Jesus was seen, Jesus is distinct from God.

But both God and Jesus existed in the infinite “beginning” (1:1) and both therefore are eternal.  This is confirmed by 1:3 which says “All things came into being through Him (the Word), and apart from Him nothing came into being that has come into being”.  There was no time that “the Word” did not exist, for God created all things through Him; even time itself.

Jesus is God.

Both verses then continue to refer to Jesus as God:

John 1:1 continues to say “and the Word was God.

John 1:18 similarly continues, “the only begotten God who is in the bosom of the Father, He has explained Him.”

Conclusions from John 1

Firstly, note that 1:18 identifies the unseen God as the Father.  One of the many similar statements is “I ascend to My Father and your Father, and My God and your God” (John 20:17).  This confirms the conclusion that the New Testament, in the vast majority of instances, reserves the title “God” for the Father.

Secondly, although John 1:1 and 1:18  refer to Jesus as God, these same verses also make a distinction between God and Jesus.  These are two different uses of the title “God:”

WHO: In the vast majority of instances the Bible uses “God” as a name for the Father, similar to the name YHVH.  It uniquely identifies the Father.  In this use of the term “God,” Jesus is not God.

WHAT: In the seven instances where Jesus is called “God,” the term “God” is used in a different sense.  It is not used as an identification, but as a description, namely that Jesus is our God.

Note the “our” and “my:”  Both Paul and Peter wrote, “Our great God … Christ Jesus” (Titus 2:13; 2 Peter 1:1).  Thomas said “My Lord and my God” (John 20:28).  In other words, although Jesus is not the God, but He is our God.

When the New Testament refers to Jesus as God, then the NT reverts back to the common meaning of the word “god.” Other people have other gods, but Jesus is our God.  This does not mean that He is God, for the title “God” is reserved for the Father, “who alone possesses immortality and dwells in unapproachable light, whom no man has seen or can see” (1 Tim. 6:16).

Why is He our God?

To discover why the writers of the New Testament declared Jesus to be our God, we must read the seven verses where He is called God.  Then we find that Jesus is our God because:

He was in the beginning with God and that God created all things through Jesus (1:1-3; Heb. 1:10).  Although everything may perish, Jesus will always remain and will always remain the same (1:11-12).  He is the only One who is able to explain God, who cannot be seen (John 1:18).  He rose from the dead (John 20:28) and He is “over all” (Rom. 9:5).  He is “Savior” who “gave Himself for us to redeem us from every lawless deed, and to purify for Himself a people for His own possession” (Titus 2:13; 2 Peter 1:1).

Is Jesus God?

This is a bad question, unless we define what we mean by “God.”  The New Testament reserves the title “God” for the uncaused Cause of all things, who cannot be seen.  Jesus referred to Him as “Father.”  Gabriel referred to Him as the “Most High.”  If we use this meaning for the title “God,” then Jesus is not God.

But in a small number of instances the New Testament refers to Jesus as “God.” These verses use a different meaning of the term “God.” These verses use the common meaning of theos, in which beings other than the uncaused Cause of all things may be called theos.  Other people have other gods, but Jesus is the One that we worship and obey.

This does not mean that Jesus is equal to the uncaused Cause of all things.  Here we depart from mainstream Christianity.

As discussed above, Jesus received everything from the Father.

Jesus is not the Creator of all things, but God created all things through Him.

If we ask whether Jesus always existed, then the answer is yes and no, for we need to understand what the questioner means.  The term “always” assumes time, and time did not always exist.  Time started when this universe was created.  Before time there was no such thing as time.  But we cannot even talk about “before” the creation of the universe.  There is just no such thing.  To talk about what exists outside time is to ask about the One “who alone possesses immortality and dwells in unapproachable light, whom no man has seen or can see” (1 Tim. 6:16).  These things are simply beyond human understanding.  But Jesus existed in the “Beginning” (John 1:1).  We can therefore safely assume that Jesus existed from the beginning of time.

Jesus is not co-equal to the Father, but He is our God, for He created us, redeemed us, sustains us, is preparing homes for us, and one day He will return to take us where He is.  Then:

All will honor the Son even as they honor the Father. He who does not honor the Son does not honor the Father who sent Him” (John 5:23).

God highly exalted Him, and bestowed on Him the name which is above every name, so that at the name of Jesus EVERY KNEE WILL BOW … to the glory of God the Father” (Phil. 2:9:11).

In the Trinity theory God is three Persons in one Being, but Jesus is not God.

The Bible makes a distinction between God and Jesus: God is the invisible Source of all things, while Jesus is visible.  Jesus refers to God as “My God” and prayed to God.  Jesus is at the right hand of God.  While Jesus was on earth, God spoke from heaven.  The Bible categorically states that God is One, and consistently distinguishes between the one true God and Jesus.  Therefore, Jesus is not God.

Not GodThis article is one of a series related to the question of whether Jesus is God.  See the list at the end of the article.  This article discusses the evidence that Jesus is distinct from God, and therefore that He is not God.  Another article will explore the evidence that He is God.

Jesus is not God.

The Trinity concept represents as one Being but three Persons; the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

Distinct – In contrast, this article shows, in a variety of ways, that the Bible MAKES A DISTINCTION between God and Jesus.  The following are some introductory examples:

Jesus as babyWhen Jesus was still a baby, His father Joseph was “warned by God in a dream not to return to Herod” (Mt 2:12).  “After being warned by God in a dream, he left for the regions of Galilee” (Mt 2:22).

Paul introduced His letters with statements such as, “Peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ” (Philemon 1:3; Eph. 1:2).

Jesus asked the Young Ruler, “Why do you call Me good? No one is good except God alone” (Mark 10:18).

The book of Revelation several times makes a distinction between Christ and God.  For example, “these have been purchased from among men as first fruits to God and to the Lamb” (14:4).

Revelation 4 describes a throne in heaven, and One sitting on the throne.   In Revelation 5 the Lamb takes the scroll from the right hand of His who sits on the throne.  Revelation 22:3, therefore, refers to “the throne of God and of the Lamb (Christ).”  See also 11:15; 21:22-23; 22:1, 3).

Jesus was fully human.

Jesus was truly and fully human.  He was born as a baby (Luke 2:7; Gal. 4:4) and had to grow in wisdom and stature (Luke 2:52).  “Although He was a Son, He learned obedience from the things which He suffered” (Heb. 5:8).  He became weary (John 4:6), thirsty (John 19:28) and hungry (Mt. 4:2).  He marveled at the faith of the centurion (Matthew 8:10) and experienced sorrow when Lazarus died (John 11:35).  He had a human body, even after His resurrection (Luke 24:39).  In Gethsemane, He grieved deeply, to the point of death (Mt. 26:38), and died the next day (Mark 15:37).  Jesus does not just look like a man; He was truly and fully human.

There is but one true God.

The Old Testament teaches that only one true God exists.

BibleThe great Shema of Israel—the foundation of Judaism—is, “Hear, O Israel! The LORD is our God, the LORD is one!” (Deut. 6:4).  (Shema is the Hebrew for the first word; “Hear”.)

Through Isaiah “the LORD” (Yahweh) declared,

44:6I am the first and I am the last, and there is NO GOD BESIDES ME.
45:21-22There is no other God besides Me … There is none except Me … I am God, and there is no other.
43:10-11 Before Me there was no God formed, And there will be none after Me.

The New Testament confirms that only one God exists.

When the scribes asked Jesus what the most important commandment is, He started His explanation by quoting from Deuteronomy: “The foremost is, ‘hear, o Israel! The Lord our God is one Lord” (Mark 12:28-30).

James similarly wrote: “You believe that GOD IS ONE; you do well. Even the demons believe—and shudder!” (James 2:19).

Jesus is distinct from the only true God.

The Trinity theory agrees that God is One, but argues that God is one Being consisting of three Persons.  The current section, therefore, continues to quote verses that confirm that God is one, but these verses make a distinction between Jesus and God:

John 17:3

Jesus prayed, “This is eternal life, that they may know You, THE ONLY TRUE GOD, and Jesus Christ whom You have sent” (John 17:3).
(Note that God SENT Jesus, which means that Jesus was subordinate to God BEFORE he was born as a human being, and therefore always will be.)

There is but one God, the Fatherand one Lord, Jesus Christ” (1 Cor. 8:6).  (It will be shown later that the title God is exclusively used for “the Father.”)

For there is one God and one mediator between God and mankind, the man Christ Jesus” (1 Tim. 2:5).

There is … one Lord, … one God and Father of all who is over all and through all and in all” (Eph. 4:4-6).  (Jesus is consistently called “Lord” while the Father is consistently called “God.”)

These verses confirm that God is One, and contrasts Jesus with God.  If Jesus prayed to the “only true God” (John 17:3), how can He also be God?

Jesus is at God’s right hand. 

Stephen saw Jesus
Stephen saw Jesus

God sits on His throne in heaven (1 Kings 22:19; Ps 11:4; 47:8). Various scriptures speak of Christ as being at the “right hand of God“:

Ascension – Jesus “was received up into heaven and sat down at the right hand of God” (Mark 16:19).

Stephen – Just before he was stoned, Stephen said, “I see the heavens opened up and the Son of Man standing at the right hand of God” (Acts 7:56).

Revelation – Jesus said that He “sat down with My Father on His throne” (Rev 3:21), where He took the sealed book from “the right hand of Him who sat on the throne” (Rev. 5:1).  See also Mt. 26:62; Acts 2:33; 7:55 or Rom. 8:34.

The fact that Jesus sits at the right hand of God confirms that He is both distinct from God and subordinate to God.  In other words, Jesus is not God.

God calls Jesus “My Son”,
but Jesus calls God “My God”.

This is My Beloved SonAt Jesus’s baptism, “a voice came out of heaven”, saying, “You are My beloved Son, in You I am well-pleased” (Luke 3:22; Mt. 3:17, cf. Col. 1:13).

Jesus said, “I ascend to My Father and to your Father, to My God and to your God” (John 20:17).  (Note that this confirms that the title God refers to the Father.

Hanging on the Cross, Jesus cried, “My God, My God, why have You forsaken me?“ (Mt. 27:46).

How can the Father be His God if Christ is God?

Jesus prayed to God.

Since God is also Jesus’ God, Jesus prayed to God:

In the days of His flesh, He offered up both prayers and supplications with loud crying and tears to the One able to save Him from death” (Heb. 5:7).

The entire John 17 is a record of Jesus praying to “the only true God” (v3).

He spent the whole night in prayer to God” (Luke 6:16).

A while later Jesus “fell on His face and prayed, saying, My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from Me; yet not as I will, but as You will’” (Matthew 26:39).  This indicates that the Father and the Son have separate and distinct wills.

God is the Source of all things; not Jesus.

This section continues to quote verses that make a distinction between God and Jesus, but these verses emphasize the difference in their roles:

There is but one God, the Father, FROM whom are all things and we exist for Him; and one Lord, Jesus Christ, by whom are all things, and we exist THROUGH Him” (1 Cor. 8:6).

All these things are from God, who reconciled us to Himself through Christ … God was in Christ reconciling the world to Himself” (2 Cor. 5:18-19).
(Note: Here we have the phrase “God was in Christ”.  But this does not mean that Jesus is God.  Rather, it indicates a unity of purpose and action.  See John 17:23.)

In the presence of God, who gives life to all things, and of Christ Jesus” (1 Timothy 6:13).

God … in these last days has spoken to us in His Son, … through whom also He made the world” (Heb. 1:1; cf. John 1:3)

These verses show that, as is also concluded in the article Jesus in Colossians, that God, the Father, is the Source of Power in creation and in salvation.  But He always works through Jesus.

God is invisible.

God is unknowable, invisible and incomprehensible:

God, the Father, “dwells in unapproachable light, whom no man has seen or can see” (1 Tim. 6:16).

No one has seen God at any time” (1 John 4:12; John 1:18).

God is Spirit” (John 4:24), and as such cannot be seen.

Not that anyone has seen the Father, except the One who is from God; He has seen the Father” (John 6:46). (In this verse we again discover evidence that it is the Father who is given the title “God.”)

God is the Source of all things, and exists outside our physical realm of time, space and matter.  The Invisible God is the source of everything that is seen.  Since Jesus is seen, He is distinct from God, and therefore not God.

Jesus is the visible image of the invisible God.

There is only one true GodThe Son “is the (visible) image of the invisible God” (Col. 1:15).

“Christ, who is the image of God” (2 Cor. 4:4)

He (His Son) is the radiance of His glory and the exact representation of His nature” (Heb. 1:3).

When Philip said to Jesus, “Lord, show us the Father“, Jesus responded, “Have I been so long with you, and yet you have not come to know Me, Philip? He who has seen Me has seen the Father; how can you say, ‘Show us the Father’?” (John 14:8-9)

Human beings cannot comprehend a Being that is everywhere, that exists without cause, and is not limited by time and space.  The Son is the visible image of the invisible God.  In His Son, appearing in a form that we can comprehend, God becomes known, visible and audible to the creatures of the universe:

No one has seen God at any time; the only begotten God who is in the bosom of the Father, He (Jesus) has explained Him” (John 1:18).

Jesus is God’s visible face and the God’s audible voice.  For that reason, He is called the Word of God (John 1:1, 14).  However, since the Father is invisible, the Son is not the image of God in physical terms, but an image of God’s character.

If God is invisible, while Jesus was certainly visible, then Jesus is distinct from God and therefore Jesus is not God.

Possible Objections

Jesus is called God.

In John 1:1 and in 1:18 Jesus is called God.  But, as discussed, the Bible clearly and consistently makes a distinction between God and Jesus.  The same two verses also make a distinction between God and Jesus by saying, “The Word was with God” (1:1) and “No one has seen God at any time” (1:18).  How can He be called God if He is not God?  This is discussed in the article Jesus in Philippians 2.  In brief, the term “God” is used in two different ways:

Most of the time the title “God” functions like a name and identifies a specific Being, namely the Most High.

In a few instances the title “God” is applied to Jesus, not to identify Him as “the only true God” (John 17:3), because He is not, but because He has “equality with God” (Phil. 2:6) in the affections and worship of the created universe.

Jesus and the Father are one in purpose and effort.

In John 10:30 Jesus said, “I and the Father are one”.  In John 14:9-11 Jesus similarly says, “He who has seen Me has seen the Father”.  Some people read into such verses that Jesus is the Father.  To be “one,” however, does not mean to be literally one Person.  Jesus, in His prayer, defined the term to “be one”:

That all of them (His followers) may be one, Father, just as you are in me and I am in you. May they also be in us so that the world may believe that you have sent me … that they may be one as we are one: I in them and you in me“ (John 17:21-23).

Christian believers must “be one” as God and Christ are one; united in purpose and unified in effort.  To “be one” therefore does not mean to be literally to be one and the same, but describes a relationship between different autonomous beings.  As Jesus said, He did the works of the Father (10:32) and He only did what pleased the Father (8:28:29).

Summary

Unmisinterpreting

God and Jesus are distinct.  When Jesus was a baby, God warned his father Joseph  “in a dream not to return to Herod” (Mt 2:12).  Paul introduced His letters with, “Peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ” (Philemon 1:3).  The 144,000 “have been purchased from among men as first fruits to God and to the Lamb” (Rev. 14:4).  It is “the throne of God and of the Lamb (Christ)” (Rev. 22:3).

There is but one God.  Hear, O Israel! The LORD is our God, the LORD is one!” (Deut. 6:4).  Jesus quoted this statement.  YHVH declared, “I am the first and I am the last, and there is no God besides Me” (Is 44:6).  James similarly wrote: “You believe that God is one; you do well” (James 2:19).

Jesus is distinct from the one true God.  Jesus prayed, “This is eternal life, that they may know You, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom You have sent” (John 17:3).  Paul wrote, “there is one God and one mediator between God and mankind, the man Christ Jesus” (1 Tim. 2:5).

Jesus is at God’s right hand.  Jesus “was received up into heaven and sat down at the right hand of God” (Mark 16:19).  This is the position of power over the entire universe, subject only to God, but confirms that Jesus is both distinct from God and subordinate to God.

Jesus calls God “My God.”  He said, “I ascend to My Father and to your Father, to My God and to your God” (John 20:17).  How can the Father be His God if Christ is God?

Jesus prayed to God.  “He offered up both prayers … to the One able to save Him from death” (Heb. 5:7).  The entire John 17 is a record of Jesus praying to “the only true God” (v3).  “He spent the whole night in prayer to God” (Luke 6:16).

God is the Source of all things; not Jesus.There is but one God, the Father, from whom are all things … and one Lord, Jesus Christ, by whom are all things” (1 Cor. 8:6).  “God … has spoken to us in His Son, … through whom also He made the world” (Heb. 1:1).

God is invisible.  “No one has seen God at any time” (1 John 4:12).  Jesus “is the (visible) image of the invisible God” (Col. 1:15).  Jesus is seen, and therefore distinct from God.  Jesus is God’s visible face and the God’s audible voice.

Since the Bible makes a distinction between God and Jesus, Jesus is not God.  The next article provides further evidence of the distinction between God and Jesus by showing that Jesus is subordinate to God.

Articles related to the question: Is Jesus God?

1.    The three views of the Son
2.    Jesus existed prior to His birth in the form of God.
3.    Jesus in Colossians
4.    Did Jesus empty Himself of equality with God?
5.    Who is the Word in John 1:1?
6.    Jesus is not God.   Current article
7.    God is the Head of ChristNext
8.    In the Bible Jesus is called God.
9.    He is the Only Begotten Son of God.
10.  God created all things through His Son.
11.  We must worship Jesus.
12.  Jesus has equality with God.
13. 
Who is Jesus? – Summary of the series of articles
14.  Where do we find Jesus in the Old Testament?